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Jupiter’s Swirling Cloud Formations : See swirling cloud…

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Jupiter’s Swirling Cloud Formations : See swirling cloud…

Jupiter’s Swirling Cloud Formations : See swirling cloud formations in the northern area of Jupiter’s north temperate belt in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. (via NASA)

Source: Just Space


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The Abyss of Time

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The Abyss of Time
image

Scotland is part of the bedrock of geology, so to speak.

In the late 18th century, Scottish farmer and scientist
James Hutton helped found the science of geology. Observing how wind and water
weathered rocks and deposited layers of soil at his farm in Berwickshire,
Hutton made a conceptual leap into a deeper and expansive view of time. After
spending decades observing the processes of erosion and sedimentation, and traveling
the Scottish countryside in search of fossils, stream cuts and interesting rock
formations, Hutton became convinced that Earth had to be much older than 6,000
years, the common belief in Western civilization at the time.

In 1788, a boat trip to Siccar Point, a rocky promontory in
Berwickshire, helped crystallize Hutton’s view. The Operational
Land Imager
 (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired
this image of the area on June 4, 2018, top. A closer view of Siccar Point is
below.

image

At Siccar Point, Hutton was confronted with the
juxtaposition of two starkly different types of rock—a gently sloping bed of
young red sandstone that was over a near vertical slab of older graywacke that
had clearly undergone intensive heating, uplift, buckling, and folding. Hutton
argued to his two companions on the boat that the only way to get the two rock
formations jammed up against one another at such an odd angle was that an
enormous amount of time must have elapsed between when they had been deposited
at the bottom of the ocean.

He was right.

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2OBnyJ8


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Source: NASA


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Comet PanSTARRS is near the Edge : The comet PanSTARRS, also…

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Comet PanSTARRS is near the Edge : The comet PanSTARRS, also…

Comet PanSTARRS is near the Edge : The comet PanSTARRS, also known as the blue comet (C/2016 R2), really is near the lower left edge of this stunning, wide field view recorded on January 13. Spanning nearly 20 degrees on the sky, the cosmic landscape is explored by well-exposed and processed frames from a sensitive digital camera. It consists of colorful clouds and dusty dark nebulae otherwise too faint for your eye to see, though. At top right, the California Nebula (aka NGC 1499) does have a familiar shape. Its coastline is over 60 light-years long and lies some 1,500 light-years away. The nebula’s pronounced reddish glow is from hydrogen atoms ionized by luminous blue star Xi Persei just below it. Near bottom center, the famous Pleiades star cluster is some 400 light-years distant and around 15 light-years across. Its spectacular blue color is due to the reflection of starlight by interstellar dust. In between are hot stars of the Perseus OB2 association and dusty, dark nebulae along the edge of the nearby, massive Taurus and Perseus molecular clouds. Emission from unusually abundant ionized carbon monoxide (CO+) molecules fluorescing in sunlight is largely responsible for the telltale blue tint of the remarkable comet’s tail. The comet was about 17 light minutes from Earth. via NASA

Source: Just Space


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Clyde Foster : In June 1975, Marshall management named Clyde…

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Clyde Foster : In June 1975, Marshall management named Clyde…

Clyde Foster : In June 1975, Marshall management named Clyde Foster to the position of director of the Equal Opportunity Office where he directed and administered a comprehensive program to assure equal opportunity in the conduct of all operations undertaken by the Center and its contractors. (via NASA)

Source: Just Space


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Land is Sliding, Tell Us Where!

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Land is Sliding, Tell Us Where!

Summer in
the northern hemisphere brings monsoon season, causing heavy
rains and flooding that trigger landslides. Next time you see a landslide in
the news, online, or in your neighborhood, submit it to our citizen science
project Landslide
Reporter
to build the largest open global landslide catalog and help
us and the public learn more about when and where they occur.

Rainfall is the most common cause
of landslides.

After a storm, the soil and rock on a slope can become saturated with water and
begin to slide downwards, posing a danger to people and destroying roads,
houses and access to electricity and water supplies.

image

We have been monitoring rainfall from
space for
decades
.

Orbiting
the Earth right now, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)
mission is a group of 10 satellites that measure rain, snow, sleet and other
precipitation worldwide every three hours. This data tells us where and when heavy
rain is falling and if it could lead to disasters.

image

What can rainfall data tell us
about landslides?

We’re
using GPM data to understand where and when landslides are happening. A global
landslide model
uses information about the environment and rainfall
to anticipate where landslides are likely to happen anytime around the world
every three hours.

image

To improve the global
landslide model
and other landslide research, NASA is looking for
citizen scientists like you!

If you find a landslide reported online or in your neighborhood, you can provide
the event details in Landslide Reporter, our citizen
science project.

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Your
detailed reports are added into an open global landslide inventory
available at Landslide Viewer. We use
citizen science contributions along with other landslide data to check our prediction
model so we can have a better picture of how rainfall, slope steepness, forest
cover, and geology can trigger a landslide.

image

Because the data is open, anyone
can use the data for research or response
.

When you report a landslide, you improve our
collection of landslide data for everyone.

Help
support landslide efforts worldwide by contributing to Landslide
Reporter
, and you can help inform decisions that could save lives
and property today! Learn more about the project at https://landslides.nasa.gov. You
can also follow the project on Twitter and Facebook.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Source: NASA


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