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Recycling Cassiopeia A : Massive stars in our Milky Way Galaxy…

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Recycling Cassiopeia A : Massive stars in our Milky Way Galaxy…

Recycling Cassiopeia A : Massive stars in our Milky Way Galaxy live spectacular lives. Collapsing from vast cosmic clouds, their nuclear furnaces ignite and create heavy elements in their cores. After a few million years, the enriched material is blasted back into interstellar space where star formation can begin anew. The expanding debris cloud known as Cassiopeia A is an example of this final phase of the stellar life cycle. Light from the explosion which created this supernova remnant would have been first seen in planet Earth’s sky about 350 years ago, although it took that light about 11,000 years to reach us. This false-color Chandra X-ray Observatory image shows the still hot filaments and knots in the Cassiopeia A remnant. High-energy emission from specific elements has been color coded, silicon in red, sulfur in yellow, calcium in green and iron in purple, to help astronomers explore the recycling of our galaxy’s star stuff – Still expanding, the blast wave is seen as the blue outer ring. The sharp X-ray image, spans about 30 light-years at the estimated distance of Cassiopeia A. The bright speck near the center is a neutron star, the incredibly dense, collapsed remains of the massive stellar core. via NASA

Source: Just Space


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Kwanzaa Tholus on Ceres : These images show a subtle feature on…

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Kwanzaa Tholus on Ceres : These images show a subtle feature on…

Kwanzaa Tholus on Ceres : These images show a subtle feature on dwarf planet Ceres called Kwanzaa Tholus. (via NASA)

Source: Just Space


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Phaethon s Brood : Based on its well-measured orbit, 3200…

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Phaethon s Brood : Based on its well-measured orbit, 3200…

Phaethon s Brood : Based on its well-measured orbit, 3200 Phaethon (sounds like FAY-eh-thon) is recognized as the source of the meteroid stream responsible for the annual Geminid meteor shower. Even though most meteor showers’ parents are comets, 3200 Phaethon is a known and closely tracked near-Earth asteroid with a 1.4 year orbital period. Rocky and sun-baked, its perihelion or closest approach to the Sun is well within the orbit of innermost planet Mercury. In this telescopic field of view, the asteroid’s rapid motion against faint background stars of the heroic constellation Perseus left a short trail during the two minute total exposure time. The parallel streaks of its meteoric children flashed much more quickly across the scene. The family portrait was recorded near the Geminid meteor shower’s very active peak on December 13. That was just before 3200 Phaethon’s historic December 16 closest approach to planet Earth. via NASA

Source: Just Space


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