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Five NASA Technologies at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show

This week, we’re attending the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where we’re
joining industrial pioneers and business leaders from across the globe to
showcase our space technology. Since 1967, CES has been the place to be for next-generation innovations to get their
marketplace debut.

Our technologies are driving exploration and enabling the
agency’s bold new missions to extend the human presence beyond the moon, to an
asteroid, to Mars and beyond. Here’s a look at five technologies we’re showing off
at #CES2017:

1. IDEAS

Our Integrated Display and Environmental Awareness System (IDEAS) is an interactive optical computer that works for smart glasses. The idea behind IDEAS is to enhance real-time operations by providing augmented reality data to field engineers here on Earth and in space. 

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This device would allow users to see and modify critical information on a transparent, interactive display without taking their eyes or hands off the work in front of them. 

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This wearable technology could dramatically improve the user’s situational awareness, thus improving safety and efficiency. 

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For example, an astronaut could see health data, oxygen levels or even environmental emergencies like “invisible” ethanol fires right on their helmet view pane. 

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And while the IDEAS prototype is an innovative solution to the challenges of in-space missions, it won’t just benefit astronauts—this technology can be applied to countless fields here on Earth.

2. VERVE

Engineers at
our Ames Research Center
are developing robots to work as teammates with
humans. 

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They created a user interface called the Visual Environment for
Remote Virtual Exploration
(VERVE)
that allows researchers to see from a robot’s perspective. 

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Using VERVE,
astronauts on the International Space Station remotely operated the K10
rover
—designed to act as a scout during NASA missions to survey terrain and
collect science data to help human explorers. 

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This week, Nissan announced that
a version of our VERVE was modified for its Seamless Autonomous Mobility
(SAM), a platform for the integration of autonomous vehicles into our society.
For more on this partnership: https://www.nasa.gov/ames/nisv-podcast-Terry-Fong

3. OnSight

Did you know that we are leveraging technology from virtual and augmented reality apps to
help scientists study Mars and to help astronauts in space? 

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The Ops Lab at
our Jet Propulsion Laboratory is at the forefront of deploying these
groundbreaking applications to multiple missions. 

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One project we’re
demonstrating at CES, is how our OnSight tool—a
mixed reality application developed for the Microsoft HoloLens
—enables
scientists to “work on Mars” together from their offices. 

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Supported by the Mars
2020 and Curiosity missions, it is currently in use by a pilot group of
scientists for rover operations. Another
HoloLens project
is being used aboard the International Space Station to
empower the crew with assistance when and where they need it.

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At CES, we’re also using the Oculus Rift virtual reality
platform to provide a tour from the launchpad at our Kennedy Space Center of
our Space
Launch System
(SLS). SLS will be the world’s most powerful rocket and will
launch astronauts in the Orion
Spacecraft
on missions to an asteroid and eventually to Mars. Engineers
continue to make progress aimed toward delivering the first SLS rocket to
Kennedy in 2018.

4. PUFFER

The Pop-Up Flat
Folding Explorer Robot, PUFFER, is an origami-inspired robotic technology prototype that folds into the
size of a smartphone. 

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It is a low-volume, low-cost enhancement whose compact
design means that many little robots could be packed in to a larger “parent”
spacecraft to be deployed on a planet’s surface to increase surface mobility.
It’s like a Mars rover Mini-Me!

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5. ROV-E

Our Remote Operated Vehicle for Education, or ROV-E, is a six-wheeled rover modeled after our Curiosity and the
future Mars 2020 Rover

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It uses off-the-shelf, easily
programmable computers and 3D-printed parts. ROV-E has four modes, including
user-controlled driving to sensor-based hazard-avoidance and “follow me” modes.
ROV-E can answer questions about Mars and follow voice commands.

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ROV-E was developed by a team of interns and young,
up-and-coming professionals at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory who wanted to
build a Mars rover from scratch to help introduce students and the public to
Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) careers, planetary
science and our Journey
to Mars
.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

Source: NASA

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Five NASA Technologies at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show

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