Find us on Google+

Uranus’s Small Moons

uranus_smallmoons[1]

 

Uranus’s Small Moons

 

Cordelia

 

Orbit: 49,752 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 7 hours
Diameter: 26 km
Gravity: 0.0073 m/s²
Mass:  1.27e21 kg

Discovered by  Voyager 2 in 1986.

Cordelia appears to be the inner shepherding satellite for Uranus’s Epsilon ring.   Cordelia and Ophelia orbit inside the synchronous orbit radius.

 

Ophelia

 

Orbit: 53,764 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 8 hours
Diameter: 32 km
Gravity: 0.007 m/s²
Mass:  ?

It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on January 20, 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 8. It was not seen until the Hubble Space Telescope recovered it in 2003  Ophelia appears to be the outer shepherding  satellite for Uranus’s Epsilon ring.

 

Bianca

 

Orbit: 59,165 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 10 hours
Diameter: 44 km
Gravity: 0.0086 m/s²
Mass:  ?
It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on January 23, 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 9
Bianca belongs to Portia Group of satellites, which also includes Cressida, Desdemona, Juliet, Portia, Rosalind, Cupid, Belinda and Perdita. These satellites have similar orbits and photometric properties. Other than its orbit, radius of 27 km, and geometric albedo of 0.08 virtually nothing is known about it.
Cressida[1]

Cressida

 

Orbit: 61,767 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 11 hours
Diameter: 66 km
Gravity: 0.013 m/s²
Mass:  ?

Cressida is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 9 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 3.

 

Desdemona

 

Orbit: 62,659 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 11 hours
Diameter: 58 km
Gravity: 0.011 m/s²
Mass:  ?
Desdemona is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 3 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 3.

Juliet

 

Orbit: 64,358 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 11 hours
Diameter:84 km
Gravity: 0.011 m/s²
Mass:  ?
Juliet is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 3 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 2.
Uranus-Portia-Cressida-Ophelia-NASA[1]

Portia

 

Orbit: 66,097 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 12 hours
Diameter:110 km
Gravity: 0.023 m/s²
Mass:  ?

Portia is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 3 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 1.

Rosalind

 

Orbit: 69,927 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 13 hours
Diameter:54 km
Gravity: 0.012 m/s²
Mass:  ?
Rosalind is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 13 January 1986, and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 4.

Belinda

 

Orbit: 75,255 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 15 hours
Diameter: 68 km
Gravity: 0.014 m/s²
Mass:  ?
Belinda is an inner satellite of the planet Uranus. Belinda was discovered from the images taken by Voyager 2 on 13 January 1986 and was given the temporary designation S/1986 U 5.

Puck

 

Puck[1]

Orbit: 86,006 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 18 hours
Diameter: 154 km
Gravity: 0.028 m/s²
Mass:  ?
Puck is an inner moon of Uranus. It was discovered in December 1985 by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. Of the 10 new Uranian moons discovered by Voyager 2, only Puck was discovered soon enough that the observation schedule could be adjusted to get images.

Caliban

 

Orbit: 7,231,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 580 days
Diameter: 172 km
Gravity: ?
Mass:  ?

Caliban is the second largest retrograde irregular moon of Uranus. It was discovered on 6 September 1997 by Brett J. Gladman, Philip D. Nicholson, Joseph A. Burns, and John J. Kavelaars using the 200-inch Hale telescope together with Sycorax and given the temporary designation S/1997 U 1

 

 

Sycorax

 

Orbit: 12,179,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 1,288 days
Diameter: 150 km
Gravity: ?
Mass:  ?
Sycorax is the largest retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. Sycorax was discovered on 6 September 1997 by Brett J. Gladman, Philip D. Nicholson, Joseph A. Burns, and John J. Kavelaars using the 200-inch Hale telescope, together with Caliban, and given the temporary designation S/1997 U 2.
Perdita_feat[1]

Perdita

 

Orbit: 76,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 15 hours
Diameter: 30 km
Gravity: 0.0047 m/s²
Mass:  ?

An object designated 1986U10 was imaged by  Voyager 2 in 1986; but not noticed until  1999 by Erich Karkoschka of the  Lunar and Planetary Lab of The University of  Arizona in Tucson. It’s orbit is nearly identical to that of Belinda, about 76,000 km from Uranus. It is  about 30 km in diameter. For several years after its discovery, this moon was thought to be  non-existent as it couldn’t be seen with Earth-based telescopes (and we have no  new spacecraft near Uranus.  But in 2003 it was recovered by the newest  camera on HST.  It’s real after all!Observations of Uranus taken in Chile in August with the 4-meter Cerro Tololo  Interamerican Observatory Blanco Telescope have revealed a probable new moon for  Uranus. The object is likely 7 to 19 kilometers across and has an orbital  semimajor axis of 8.5 million km. Matthew J. Holman (Harvard-Smithsonian Center  for Astrophysics) led the trio of observers that made the initial discovery. The  finding was announced on the International Astronomical Union Circular 7980.

 

 

Trinculo

 

Orbit: 8,504,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 759 days
Diameter: 18 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?

Trinculo is a retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Holman, et al. on 13 August 2001, and given the temporary designation S/2001 U 1.

Prospero

 

Orbit: 16,256,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 1978 days
Diameter: 50 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?

 Prospero is a relatively small retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus discovered on 18 July 1999 by the astrophysicist Matthew Holman and his team, and given the provisional designation S/1999 U 3.

Setebos

 

Orbit: 17,418,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 2225 days
Diameter: 48 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?
Setebos is one of the outermost retrograde irregular satellites of Uranus. It was discovered on 18 July 1999 by John J. Kavelaars et al. and provisionally designated S/1999 U 1.

Stephano

 

Orbit: 8,004,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 677 days
Diameter: 32 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?
Stephano is a retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 1999, and given the provisional designation S/1999 U 2

Mab

 

Orbit: 97,736 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 22 hours
Diameter: 25 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?
Mab, or Uranus XXVI, is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Mark R. Showalter and Jack J. Lissauer in 2003 using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Cupid

 

Orbit: 74,392 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 15 hours
Diameter: 18 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?
Cupid is an inner satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Mark R. Showalter and Jack J. Lissauer in 2003 using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Ferdinand

 

Orbit: 20,901,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 2,887 days
Diameter: 12 km
Gravity:?
Mass:  ?
Ferdinand is the outermost retrograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, John J. Kavelaars, Dan Milisavljevic, and Brett J. Gladman on August 13, 2001, and given the provisional designation S/2001 U 2.

Margaret

 

Orbit: 14,345,000 km from Uranus
Orbital period: 1,687 days
Diameter: 20 km
Margaret is the only prograde irregular satellite of Uranus. It was discovered by Scott S. Sheppard, et al. in 2003 and given the provisional designation S/2003 U 3.
by
Uranus’s Small Moons

by with no comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *